The Gift of Admitting When You are Wrong

A gentle word turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. Proverbs 15:1

One of the best gifts you can give a person is to take a step back, examine yourself, and admit when you are wrong. Even if you aren’t 100% in the wrong, take accountability for your own actions without expecting anything from them in return. Even if they choose not to take ownership for their wrong, you have at least planted a seed—that seed being the example you’ve set. Your example, how you carry yourself, is a big part of your purpose as a Godly person.

This passed week something kind of strange happened. I agreed to do something, and in a moment of ignorance, assumed I was agreeing to something completely different. I inconvenienced two people by an honest yet ignorant mistake.

All I could think to ask was “Why, God?” Why did this happen? I believe everything happens for a reason. When life gets hard, I tend to ask myself, “What is God trying to teach me here?” I was stumped; I just couldn’t figure out what the lesson was. I didn’t mean to misinterpret what I had agreed to, and I couldn’t for the life of me figure out how I could have possibly prevented the situation from happening. It was almost as if my brain turned off for a moment when I made the agreement. But why? That’s when it hit me. Maybe the lesson wasn’t for me. Maybe the purpose of the misunderstanding was so I could be an example to other people of how a Godly person should behave when they mess up and then have the opportunity to turn around and write about it. Sometimes God uses life to teach us lessons, and sometimes God uses us to teach and lead others.

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